jump to navigation

Theonomy (ironically) depends on Common Sense Realism 13 March, 2014

Posted by Benjamin P. Glaser in Uncategorized.
add a comment

Originally posted on Ephraim's Arrow:

Daniel quotes Jus Divinum on the Mosaic Judicials (the following is my inference, not necessarily his).

We answer, the Laws of the Jewish Church, whether Ceremonial or Judicial, so far forth are in force, even at this day, as they were grounded upon common equity, the principles of reason and nature, and were serving to the maintenance of the Moral Law. … The Jewish Politie is only abrogated in regard of what was in it of particular right, not of common right, so far forth as there was in their Laws either a typicalness proper to their Church, or a peculiarness of respect to their state in that Land of Promise given unto them.  Whatsoever was in their Laws of Moral concernment, or general equity is still obliging …[2]

Conclusion:  Whatever else 19.4 might mean, it clearly states that the use of the judicials…

View original 108 more words

Blog Reboot 1 February, 2011

Posted by Benjamin P. Glaser in Uncategorized.
1 comment so far

This blog has provided a great resource for me and hopefully for others. However its 5 1/2 year life has run its course and needs put down. Blogging shall go on but at a different place and with a cleaner look.

Please update your blog rolls accordingly when the new place is announced.

Go here:

 

http://benjaminpglaser.wordpress.com/

Happy Birthday Marines! 10 November, 2010

Posted by Benjamin P. Glaser in USMC.
Tags: , ,
2 comments

 

George Grant on Humanism 5 November, 2010

Posted by Benjamin P. Glaser in George Grant, Humanism.
Tags: , ,
add a comment

‎”Humanism and its various programs, policies, and agendas can’t work because it is out of touch with reality (Eph. 5:6). It is fraught with fantasy (Col 2:8). Only the Bible can tell us of things as they really are (Ps 19:7-11). Only the Bible faces reality squarely, completely, and honestly (Deut 30:11-14). Thus, only the Bible can illumine genuine solutions to the problems that plague mankind (Ps 119:105).”

George Grant, “In the Shadow of Plenty” pg. 6

http://www.entrewave.com/freebooks/docs/216e_47e.htm

John Calvin on the Second Commandment 3 November, 2010

Posted by Benjamin P. Glaser in Images of the Godhead, Institutes of the Christian Religion, John Calvin, Second Commandment.
Tags: , , ,
add a comment

‎”Seeing that this brutish stupidity has overspread the globe, men longing after visible forms of God, and so forming deities of wood and stone, silver and gold, or of any other dead and corruptible matter, we must hold it as a first principle, that as often as any form is assigned to God, his glory is corrupted by an impious lie. In the Law, accordingly, after God had claimed the glory of divinity for himself alone, when he comes to show what kind of worship he approves and rejects, he immediately adds, “Thou shalt not make unto thee any graven image, or anylikeness of any thing that is in heaven above, or in the earth beneath, or in the water under the earth,” (Exod. 20:4). By these words he curbs any licentious attempt we might make to represent him by a visible shape, and briefly enumerates all the forms by which superstition had begun, even long before, to turn his truth into a lie.” –

John Calvin, Institutes Book 1, Ch. 11, Sect. 1

Matthew Henry On the Intertwined Nature of the 4th and 5th Commandments 27 October, 2010

Posted by Benjamin P. Glaser in Leviticus, Matthew Henry, Sabbath.
Tags: , , , ,
add a comment

From Matthew Henry’s Commentary on the Book of Leviticus, Chapter 19, verse 3:

“That children be obedient to their parents: “You shall fear every man his mother and his father, v. 3. 1. The fear here required is the same with the honour commanded by the fifth commandment; see Mal. i. 6. It includes inward reverence and esteem, outward expressions of respect, obedience to the lawful commands of parents, care and endeavour to please them and make them easy, and to avoid every thing that may offend and grieve them, and incur their displeasure. The Jewish doctors ask, “What is this fear that is owing to a father?” And they answer, “It is not to stand in his way nor to sit in his place, not to contradict what he says nor to carp at it, not to call him by his name, either living or dead, but ‘My Father,’ or ‘Sir;’ it is to provide for him if he be poor, and the like.” 2. Children, when they grow up to be men, must not think themselves discharged from this duty: every man, though he be a wise man, and a great man, yet must reverence his parents, because they are his parents. 3. The mother is put first, which is not usual, to show that the duty is equally owing to both; if the mother survive the father, still she must be reverenced and obeyed. 4. It is added, and keep my sabbaths. If God provides by his law for the preserving of the honour of parents, parents must use their authority over their children for the preserving of the honour of God, particularly the honour of his sabbaths, the custody of which is very much committed to parents by the fourth commandment, Thou, and thy son, and thy daughter. The ruin of young people has often been observed to begin in the contempt of their parents and the profanation of the sabbath day. Fitly therefore are these two precepts here put together in the beginning of this abridgment of the statutes: “You shall fear, every man, his mother and his father, and keep my sabbaths. Those are hopeful children, and likely to do well, that make conscience of honouring their parents and keeping holy the sabbath day. 5. The reason added to both these precepts is, “I am the Lord your God; the Lord of the sabbath and the God of your parents.”

For more see this link.

John MacArthur On Antichrist 26 October, 2010

Posted by Benjamin P. Glaser in Anti-Christ, John MacArthur.
Tags:
add a comment

Anthony Carter, “On Being Black and Reformed” 22 October, 2010

Posted by Benjamin P. Glaser in 5-Point Calvinism, African-American Theology, Anthony Carter, Reformed Theology.
Tags: , ,
1 comment so far

I cannot recommend this book enough. It has been a very enjoyable read. It has one of the best explanations of Reformed theology I have ever read and the author also shows an amazing depth of understanding of the sovereignty of God. I have learned a lot in reading this book just about the beauty of Reformed theology not to mention how that plays itself out in the African-American community. It is a must read. Go buy it now and read it.

This book was very convicting. Excellent read.

You can find it here.

Here is a couple excerpts:

‎”We must not come to the Bible as skeptics, demanding that it satisfy our independent judgement. Rather we must submit to the Bible as our examiner, which reveals our inadequacies of understanding. If we do otherwise, we make the Bible submit to our authority and reason, as if it receives its authority and validation from us. This must not be.” — Anthony Carter, “On Being Black and Reformed” pg. 8-9

‎”The kingdom of God comprises a diversity of people with a common heritage. This heritage is not primarily black, white, red, yellow, or brown, but is a heritage rooted in redemptive history. And the history of redemption is not black history, white history, or African or European history. It is God’s history. Therefore any understanding of God’s activity in history must begin and end with the fact though the individuals are diverse and varied, the God who sovereignly reigns over history is one and the same. Yesterday, today and forever.” — Anthony Carter, “On Being Black and Reformed” pg. 63

Atheism and Evil 22 October, 2010

Posted by Benjamin P. Glaser in Os Guinness, Problem of Evil, Uncategorized.
Tags: , ,
1 comment so far

“For Charles Darwin and all who make evolution and natural selection central to their view of life, realism constantly tends to collapse into pessimism, whatever their individual protestations of joy and hope in life. And the reason is simple. Not only is natural selection utterly blind to evil and suffering, but it favors the “selfish gene” and the survivalistic ethic of “might makes right” that is the evil heart of oppression and abuse of power. No account of twentieth-century evil can ignore its close kinship to the dark side of Nietzsche’s will to power.” — Os Guinness, “Unspeakable: Facing Up to the Challenge of Evil” pg. 130

You can find the book here.

Richard Baxter On the Primary Foundation of the Ministry 12 October, 2010

Posted by Benjamin P. Glaser in Pastoral Care, Richard Baxter.
Tags: ,
add a comment

“See that the work of saving grace be thoroughly wrought in your own souls. Take heed to yourselves, lest you be void of that saving grace of God which you offer to others, and be strangers to the effectual working of that gospel which you preach; and lest, while you proclaim to the world the necessity of a Savior, your own hearts should neglect him and you should miss of an interest in him and his saving benefits.“– Richard Baxter, “The Reformed Pastor” pg. 53

Buy the book here

Republocrat: Confessions of a Liberal Conservative 10 October, 2010

Posted by Benjamin P. Glaser in Carl Trueman, Westminster Theological Seminary.
Tags: , , ,
add a comment

Got this new book by Carl Trueman of Westminster Seminary Philadelphia as a throw-in to get my recent purchase from WTS over the magical $40 mark to get shipping for a buck. Really glad I did. Excellent little book that only took me two hours to read. Including the intro and forward it is about 125 pages.

Now I of course disagree with Dr. Trueman on some of his thoughts on free-market capitalism and gun-control and universal healthcare. Though I agree wholeheartedly with the negative side that he notes on this and believe that only through a Christian worldview can it be kept in check. Even more to the point Biblical Law looks a lot more like a “nanny-state” than most conservatives would like to think and or believe.

On another front his description of politics in America is spot-on (to use a British colloquialism). He does a good job I think in describing the many contradictions on the Left and the Right when it comes to ideology. He takes a not-so-veiled shot at Fox News and its commentators that are featured at 5:00pm and 8:00pm. His criticism of Fox comes from two angles. First its founder Rupert Murdoch hardly espouses the policies that the news network’s idealogical mouthpieces preach. Secondly is the irony of the “family values” network’s use of highly attractive and scantily clad anchor babes (to use a Limbaugh phrase) as well as the need for Fox News to belittle the intelligence of its watchers by reducing every issue to a Manichean “liberal = evil” and “conservative = good”. For those of you wondering he does take full aim at MSNBC and Olberman/Maddow as well.

Overall an excellent book and well worth the money and effort.

You can find the work here at WTS Books.

John Owen on Vol. 5 28 September, 2010

Posted by Benjamin P. Glaser in Uncategorized.
add a comment

‎”We are justified by faith alone, but we are not justified by that faith which can be alone. Alone, respects its influence into our justification, not its nature and existence. And we absolutely deny that we can be justified by that faith which can be alone. That is without a principle of spiritual life and universal obedience operative in all the works of it as duty doth require.” — John Owen, Works Vol. 5 pg 73

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.